Driving with Kiddo: 6 tips for tear-free, toddler-friendly road trips

Scenes like this from the Icefields Parkway - not yours to behold when you're trying to beat the crying clock of your bambino. Photo credit: Walter Lam/Flickr/CC
Scenes like this from the Icefields Parkway – not yours to behold when you’re trying to beat the cry clock of your bambino. Photo credit: Walter Lam/Flickr/CC

As I drove north on the Icefields Parkway, the western spine of Canada (aka the Rocky Mountains), the road trip was a blur. I was racing against time: trying to get to my destination before my then five-month-old woke up hungry and angry after being in a car for WAY TOO LONG on this seemingly NEVERENDING (translation: two days) road trip.

We sped by so many sights – Castle Mountain, Crowfoot Glacier, Mount Chepheren – instead of stopping to bask in the grandeur of the Canadian Rockies like all the other happy-looking families, we didn’t. There was just one panicky thought on repeat in my head: ‘When is this road trip going to end?’

We were on day two of travel across British Columbia and part of Alberta to go see my partner in central Alberta. Here we were on an incredibly beautiful road trip that people from around the world pay big bucks to come and do. Frankly I didn’t enjoy the scenic surroundings because I didn’t pack enough supplies or give myself enough time to get there. We ended up having to stop in David Thompson, kiddo balling his eyes out and mommy very frazzled for a snack, leg stretch and calm down.

Fast forward a year. Many road trips – Tofino, Victoria, Kamloops, Lesser Slave Lake, Calgary, Drumheller – big and small later, we are starting to find our family travel groove. I once interviewed Micheal A. Palmer – an international traveller, family guy and author. He travelled across Canada with his wife and THREE, yes, three kids a few summers ago and had all kinds of wisdom to share. The uptake: plan, stop often, eat healthy. You can read more here.

The summer of 2015 we explored Alberta. After a few slightly stressful trips, I decided to try to start learning from our four-wheel journeys. Whether I’m driving alone with our little dude or we’re on a trip with the whole fam (mama, daddy + tiny tyrant), if I implement the six tips below, it makes for a tear-free trip.  Read more

24 Hours in Drumheller, Alberta: Dinosaurs, Villages and Family Friendly Fun

The ephemera of the Last Chance Saloon keeps both you and old occupied until your food arrives.
The ephemera of the Last Chance Saloon keeps both you and old occupied until your food arrives.

As we scrambled down a steep, clay covered canyon I decided to swallow my pride and just slide down on my backside. I was the caboose on this little, yet treacherous, hike down to a plateau overlooking the many levels of Horse Thief Canyon. I slide down, back side grazing the clay because I had a 24 pound human on my back and was feeling about as sure footed as a newborn foal.

Once at the bottom of the 25 metre descent, I stood up, kid chattering away on my back, dusting off my clay covered gluteus.   The only other backside slider in my hiking group was my friend’s five year old daughter. We gave each other high fives after our little scramble and set out to examine the many interesting rocks protruding from the crumbling clay and sandstone of the canyon sides. There was even an area flat enough to let my son down and out of the backpack to waddle along the plateau.

Welcome to the canyons and hoodoos surrounding Canada’s dinosaur capital, Drumheller, Alberta.

My hiking buddies were a five-year old, nine year old (who leapt from steep surface to surface like a gazelle) and two of my dearest friends, their parents. Rewind to 48 hours previous when I received a welcome but totally spontaneous invite to join them in Drumheller. See my previous post about last minute travel decisions here.

You, see, when you get a call from a friend who lives faraway on Vancouver Island, you drop weekend plans and start packing tout de suite.   Read more