Anthology ~ April 2017 ~ Mama Earth Edition

April Link Round up: Mama Earth edition

Do you remember your first Earth Day celebration?

My recollections are a bit fuzzy, but I can remember what I looked like when my Earth Day awareness started. Braces, spiral perm, high wasted pants and GIANT gold rimmed glasses. (I know this because I recently found some very awkward grade seven photos – ermagawd).

I think my first Earth Day celebration had something to do with recycling. I was on my elementary school’s recycling committee and we were very passionate about getting paper recycling set up in our early 90s classrooms. Fast forward to young adulthood – there were marches, drum circles, hikes, waitressing shifts, exams, camping trips. This year we tried to spend a good chunk of out time upping our biophilia on a little hike down about half of the Petsuta Trail in Naikoon Provinvial Park. It was a successful hike by toddler parent standards. We wandered about five kilometres round trip through a rainforest, along the banks of a river and then back through the forest. The kiddo was a champ and I’m pretty sure he equates outside time with feeling healthy and happy. So… parenting win?

This month’s anthology focuses on Earth Day and Mother Nature – from earthy drinks to some sweet videos, I hope you enjoy this little link round up.  Read more

How did you get that f*#king awesome job Jeremy Koreski?

Jeremy Koreski goes deep.
Jeremy Koreski goes deep.

His body of work spans decades, he’s worked with a huge range of respectable brands (Patagonia, Clifbar, Adidas, Sitka to name a few) and he’s one of Canada’s eminent surf photographer and videographers. These are all accolades that could swell any head or distract any big shot from the issues that matter in their home town.

But for Tofino, B.C.-based photographer Jeremy Koreski, an experience swimming in a pool of 15,000 salmon in a river on Vancouver Island, spurred him to take on a newer, and some would argue, more important project. Enter his photo book: This is Nowhere. A gorgeous, black, hard covered photo tome replete with lush greens, brilliant blues and deep oranges, the coffee table staple is part ode to life on British Columbia’s coast and part archive of the species that millennia-old, coastal ecosystems. Like me, Jeremy loves salmon and wants to share just how they are the backbone, the canary and the focal species of coastal communities and forest webs of life.  Read more

How did you get that f*#king awesome job Grace Dubery?

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Imagine a crowd of thousands of people dressed in white, doing yoga in a giant public space in Paris or Toronto, dedicating their practice to peace. Next, picture people doing yoga to encourage grassroots activism and leadership in South Africa.

Close your eyes and visualize yoga classes in the prisons, schools, special need centers, HIV/AIDS support groups and rural villages of Kenya, all the while, connecting newbie Kenyans with yoga teachers from around the globe.

Involved in all of these is a serene, beautiful yoga teacher from Toronto: Grace Dubery. She teaches at the Art Gallery of Ontario, where a close friend of mine takes her classes and raves about her serene, stretchy vibe.

Dubery leads a GIGANTIC yoga version of Diner en Blanc called the Lole White Tour (minus the booze and potluck) where thousands of yogis dress in white, practice their asanas on yellow mats to music. Sign me up.

Originally from in Portugal, Dubery moved to Montreal as a teen and studied Political Science and African Studies in both Montreal and Nairobi. She began teaching yoga in 2006 and has used her practice to connect communities and people in many parts of the world. In 2011, she traveled to South Africa with Off the Mat, Into the World ® to support HIV/AIDS health, education and prevention programs. If the objective of yoga to help people become both grounded and present, then the movement is lucky to have Dubery as a passionate, globe-trotting facilitator.

Read more about her f*#king awesome job after the jump.  Read more

How did you get that f*#king awesome job Greg and Sarah Greenleese?

Beekeepers Sarah and Greg Greenleese.
Meadow Sweet Apiaries beekeepers Sarah and Greg Greenleese.

Did you know that there are 169 million bees in Alberta and the province produces 40% of Canada’s honey? The Greenleeses do. Greg and Sarah Greenleese are two of Alberta’s 800 beekeepers and are pretty much some of the sweetest conservationists you’ll meet in Alberta (pun fully intended).

When Sarah talks about her bees, her face lights up as though she’s talking about children, a family pet or her husband Greg. When Greg talks about his bees, he has an air of authority, like Peter Mansbridge reporting the nightly news. These folks are serious about their jobs as Meadow Sweet Apiaries co-CEOs, chief honey pullers and environmental advocates.

Just outside of Edmonton in a tiny farming community called Tofield, the Greenleeses don their giant white suits each summer to tend their grist of bees. Late July and all of August is like the Stanley Cup playoffs for them: busy as hell, tiring and often risky. Success isn’t always guranteed. This year has been a good one – they both have been pulling honey overtime to try to get everything packaged and stored to sell for the remainder of the year at Edmonton’s Old Strathcona Farmer’s Market.

If you’ve ever been by Edmonton’s Old Strathcona Farmer’s Market, you’ll see their smiling faces every Saturday. They sell all kinds of honey and honey products, from divine smelling candles, soap and different sized jars of honey plus propolis. Propolis or bee glue is a sticky, waxy brown substance that the bees use to chink the nooks and crannies of their homes and people (since the days of Cleopatra) use as an ancient healing remedy.  What I particularly love most about this super cute due of apiarists is their passion not only for beekeeping but also the environment. I dare you to ask them about dandelion spray or pesticides: both can ream off stats and facts about the ill-effects of wanton pesticide spraying. The bees of central Alberta are lucky to have two such knowledgeable and dedicated advocates.

So this week, I’m super stoked to Anchors+Proteas first ever couple interview about a couple of f*#king awesome jobs?

Read more