How did you get that F*#king awesome job Abe Chabaan?

Abe-ChaabanRZ

If you’ve ever visited Vancouver and bought hummus, chances are you’ve tried one of the many dip varietals from Habibi’s Mediterranean Foods. A potluck staple and high protein, diet friendly dish, hummus is also a Lebanese meal essential. Enter dad, entrepreneur and torch bearer of Habibi’s hummus empire: Abe Chabaan. Chabaan went into business with his mom after her Vancouver restaurant closed a few years back.

But, when Chabaan’s mother’s shop – Mona’s Mediterranean Foods – closed, more doors opened: the chance for Abe to help his mom continue making, fresh, all natural mediterranean foods under the Habibi’s banner. Based on the recipes of Abe’s grandparents and great grandparents, Habibi’s is most known for it’s highly addictive hummus products, however they also make creamy Baba Ghanoush, Tzaziki and Tahini. Now, Habibi’s is available throughout British Columbia, Ontario, the Yukon, Northwest Territory, and the Prairies.

In Aramaic and Arabic, Habibi’s literally means “beloved, friend or darling.” After years of eating Habibi’s fantastic, old-world hummus, I can’t think of a better name for this family-run company. Here’s a glimpse into dad, hummus maker and astronomy buff Abe Chabaan’s life and f*#king awesome job.

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How did you get that f*#king awesome job Eagranie Yuh?

Eagranie2(EagranieYuh)Have you ever met one of those people who knows where to grab the best sandwich, show you the prettiest hotel lobbies and can rub elbows in the dingiest bar or the snootiest art party? Layer on top of this panache, an unrelenting love for chocolate, a fantastic fashion sense and a silky vocabulary that can describe even the most illusive of flavors.
Sounds like a difficult set of descriptions to package into one person or personality right? Wrong. This is Eagranie Yuh: blogger, organic chemist, international chocolate award judge, pastry chef and author. Through her food writing on The Well Tempered Chocolatier, as a senior editor at Edible Vancouver & Wine Country and as a judge and organizer of the 2013 Canadian International Chocolate Awards, Eagranie’s love of chocolate shines through.
It’s no surprise that in 2014 Yuh published a book that acts as guide for adventures in chocolate tasting and eating. The Chocolate Tasting Kit published by Chronicle Books, is one of the most curious of food-based volumes on my shelf. The kit comes with a tasting guide, cue cards, note paper and the cutest little envelope for keeping your favourite wrappers in. It’s also one of the most practical items in my cookbook repertoire.
Though I’ve known Yuh socially for years, I’ve only just learned of her professional chocolately exploits in the last couple of years. So who is this person who dedicates so much of her time educating and spreading cocoa-inspired wisdom? Read about her and her f*#king awesome job after the jump.

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How did you get that f*#king awesome job Jeremy Koreski?

Jeremy Koreski goes deep.
Jeremy Koreski goes deep.

His body of work spans decades, he’s worked with a huge range of respectable brands (Patagonia, Clifbar, Adidas, Sitka to name a few) and he’s one of Canada’s eminent surf photographer and videographers. These are all accolades that could swell any head or distract any big shot from the issues that matter in their home town.

But for Tofino, B.C.-based photographer Jeremy Koreski, an experience swimming in a pool of 15,000 salmon in a river on Vancouver Island, spurred him to take on a newer, and some would argue, more important project. Enter his photo book: This is Nowhere. A gorgeous, black, hard covered photo tome replete with lush greens, brilliant blues and deep oranges, the coffee table staple is part ode to life on British Columbia’s coast and part archive of the species that millennia-old, coastal ecosystems. Like me, Jeremy loves salmon and wants to share just how they are the backbone, the canary and the focal species of coastal communities and forest webs of life.  Read more

How did you get that f*#king awesome job Heather Moore?

Heather Moore in her Cape Town shop.
Heather Moore in her Cape Town shop.

Finding a good designer is like finding a favourite brand of jeans – you like how they make you feel, the way you (or your home) look and you realize you’ll go to great lengths to continue following their evolution as an artist. This is how I feel like South African designer Skinny laMinx, whose real name is Heather Moore.

Ever since I spent an afternoon in Stellenbosch in 2008 and bought a few of her pieces at a stylish boutique (the name escapes me: because, wine touring). Since then, I sometimes find Skinny laMinx stationary in places like Chapters or purchase some of her textiles online. Her designs are often simple and bright lighting up any room they inhabit. My favourite Skinny laMinx design of all time are her pin cushion protea fabric.

When I started following Moore on Instagram and heard about the classes she runs in India teaching people about textile printing and patterns, I added the trip to my bucket list. A hang out in India learning about design with like minded folks and a super inspiring artist, no problem. This past month, I finally mustered up the moxy to ask her for an interview, she obliged, therefore confirming yet another aspect of Heather Moore/Skinny laMinx that I adore: she’s a nice person, who also has a potty mouth.

Here’s an interview with Cape Town-based, Heather Moore of Skinny laMinx about what makes her job as an illustrator and textile artist so f*#king awesome.

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