Luxe RV Holiday Dreams + Our First Birthday

Airstream photo credit: J Brossard/Flickr/CC
Airstream photo credit: J Brossard/Flickr/CC

This week marks a couple of fun times for Anchors + Proteas. We celebrated the blog’s first birthday this week by making a giant chocolate cake that lasted all week long. As the weather starts warming up, my mind turns to summer trip planning. Enter: Canadian RVing and Camping Week, which reminds me of my youth and my grandparents. To mark Anchors + Proteas first 366 days of publishing, I thought I’d walk you through some of my fantasy RV resorts, where the style is abundant and the actual parking of your accommodation a non-issue.

I grew up exploring British Columbia in RVs with my mom and grandparents during the summer. We would inevitably pull up to a clear, cool lake or river, set up camp and dive into a weekend of hot dogs, wrinkly toes from too much lake time and close quartered board games. In my teens, my RVing experience upgraded when my grandparents bought a fairly deluxe 5th wheel trailer which they treated like their fourth child: each winter they would tuck it gingerly in bed and each spring, just as carefully, wake the Citation up for numerous baths, meals and many-wheeled trips around southern B.C.

The RV adventures I swoon over these days are more sedentary in nature, the types of journeys that require beginner-level backing up skills and a fraction of the gas price. The kind of Airstream, Boler or converted bus experience I’m fantasizing about focuses on ease, location and style. In other words: we arrive, unpack our groceries, throw on our flip flops and R-E-L-A-X.  Herewith, my fantasy Airstream-esque trips from around the globe.  Read more

Weekend Anthology ~ March 2016

New nightly view
The new view

Well hello there dear online friends. It’s been a bit longer than a blink, hasn’t it? I’m writing this from our new home, after settling into a new job in a place about 1600 kilometres west of our dear Edmonton to the moist, green shores of Haida Gwaii.

We live near the ocean on a set of islands we’ve both road tripped to and our little dude ABSOLUTELY loves his new ocean, mountain and rainforest life. People here on Haida Gwaii as are sweet as I remember them and the towns as small, distinct and curious.

This is probably the first time I’ve had: A) steady internet, B) a quiet moment and C) the time to revel in all things amazing on the internet (a long story that involves a cancelled flight, a missed wedding of a dear friend and staying up late organizing Easter treats). Life’s duties aside, here are some of the things I’ve loved in the last month.

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Wolves in The Great Bear Rainforest: A Trip to Remember

The Great Bear Rainforest: B.C.'s temperate rainforest treasure at the end of a rainbow. Photo credit: Tom Green
The Great Bear Rainforest: B.C.’s temperate rainforest treasure at the end of a rainbow. Photo credit: Tom Green

There was a giant whoop up this week in British Columbia. After nearly 20 years of protests, meetings, market campaigns, many, many negotiations First Nations, Environmental groups, logging companies and varying levels of government – a final deal was struck to protect the Great Bear Rainforest. For visual learners, skip the jump below to watch Greenpeace Canada’s pretty succinct video. For those who like to read go here.

From 2004-2006 I worked for environmental project funded by Greenpeace, ForestEthics and the Sierra Club of B.C. Because of this job I learned so much about B.C.’s temperate coastal rainforests, a bit about coastal First Nations and the geography of this sparsely-populated-but-highly-bio-diverse part of the planet. And because of this job, I had the privilege of visiting the Great Bear Rainforest in the fall of 2004.

Looking for photos from my Bella Bella to Port Hardy sailing trip, I found an article I wrote for Lululemon‘s magazine in 2005, so voila, here it is again. Since I wrote this piece 11 years ago, millions of hectares of rainforest (3.1mil to be exact) have been protected and many many people are working hard to prove that an economy based on eco-tourism and sustainable resource harvesting could be better than trophy hunting and clear cutting.

I’m so glad this forest is protected so I can take my son there one day to hear the wolves howl and listen to the salmon swim upstream. Virtual high fives to all involved, I’m so proud of you friends.

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